Zodiac The Meaning of the Metal

Western Astrology Zodiac Horoscopes  Chinese Astrology Zodiac Horoscopes

Iron  Copper  Mercury  Silver  Gold  Nickel  Steel  Tin  Lead  Aluminum  Platinum

Iron

The word iron is derived from Anglo-Saxon iron. In Latin, it is called ferrum, of which the symbol Fe was derived. Iron was known since the prehistoric times. There is some historic evidence to indicate that iron was first smelted by the Hittites as early as the third millennium BC. However, the smelting process was not known in other places until around 1200 BC when the Hittite empire fell. Iron is perhaps the most important metal known to man.

 

Copper

From Latin cuprum, the island of Cyprus. The metal has been known since ancient times. It is one of the man's most important metal. As early as 3500 BC it was already obtained by charcoal reduction of its ores. By 3000 BC knowledge of adding tin to copper to make bronze was already appreciated in Mesopotamia and Greece (the Bronze age).

 

Mercury

Derived from the planet Mercury. The symbol Hg is derived from the word hydrargyrum, meaning liquid silver. The element is known to ancient. It was found in Egyptian's tombs since 1500 BC. The mercury mineral cinnabar (HgS) was used as a pigment in the ancient world while extraction of the element from cinnabar and mercury amalgamation have been known since 500 BC. Up to 1500 AD, in ancient times alchemists regarded the metal as a key to the transmutation of base metals to gold (folklore)

 

Silver

Derived from Anglo-Saxon siolfur. The symbol is derived from the Latin argentum, for silver. The metal has been known since ancient time, as one of the coinage metals, probably as early as 3000 BC

 

Gold

From Anglo-Saxon gold. The symbol Au is derived from Latin aurum for gold. It has been used as coins and ornaments by Egyptians since 3400 BC.

 

Nickel

From German Nickel, Satan or Old Nick's and from kupfernickel, Old Nick's copper. The name was derived due to the Saxon miners' inability to extract copper from the reddish-colored ore niccolite (NiAs), which resembles in appearance to that of red Cu2O. They blamed this was due to the work of the devil. The metal was first isolate, in impure form, from the ore niccolite ("Kupfernickel") by A.F. Cronstedt in 1751.

 

Steel

The word iron is derived from Anglo-Saxon iron. In Latin, it is called ferrum, of which the symbol Fe was derived. Iron was known since the prehistoric times. There is some historic evidence to indicate that iron was first smelted by the Hittites as early as the third millennium BC. However, the smelting process was not known in other places until around 1200 BC when the Hittite empire fell. Iron is perhaps the most important metal known to man.

 

Tin

Derived from Anglo-Saxon. The symbol was derived from the Latin Stannum. The metal is known since ancient times, dated as far back as 3500 BC.

 

Lead

The word lead is Anglo-Saxon while in Latin it is called plumbum. Long known since prehistoric times. It was used in ancient Egypt for glazing pottery since at least 5000 BC. The Romans used lead for water pipes and plumbing.

 

Aluminum

From Latin alumen, meaning bitter salt. It derives its name from alum, KAl(SO4)2.12H2O, where the ancient Greek and Roman used it as a mordant in dyeing. In 1807, H. Davy, who was not able to isolate the metal, proposed the name alumium and later changed to aluminum.It was then modified again to the name aluminium. The impure metal was first isolated by H.C. Oersted using the reaction of dilute potassium amalgam on aluminium(III) chloride, in 1825.

 

Platinum

From Spanish platina, meaning silver. Its use as ornamental artifacts have been realized by the Indians of Ecuador well before the Spanish conquest. However, its elemental nature was first discovered by A. de Ulloa, a Spanish astronomer, in 1736 in the gold mines of what is now Colombia. His report on the discovery was not published until 1748, due to the unfortunate incident of his ship being fallen victim to privateers and finally captured by the British Navy. Meanwhile, in 1741, C. Wood discovered the metal from a sample brought from Colombia. It became known as 'white gold' but the term in now used to refer to Au/Pd alloy.